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Sunday Art Fair

SUNDAY: Descending into an industrial alley to find the concrete refuge feels raw and arguably more interesting than the more polished events. The expansive interior is an ideal backdrop for the diverse work, which is found inside.
Sunday Art Fair
Ambika P3, University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London 14th October – 16th October Entrance free, no need to book October’s Art Week is an exciting time for London; you’d have to have your head in the clouds to miss the buzz around Frieze art fair. Amplifying this is the up-and-coming art fair Sunday, which takes place in a concrete hangar below the University of Westminster- just down the road from Frieze. This proximity benefits Sunday, as it enables a direct comparison, showing how fresh the newer fair is. Descending into an industrial alley to find the concrete refuge feels raw and arguably more interesting than the more polished events. The expansive interior is an ideal backdrop for the diverse work, which is found inside. Sunday features galleries from around the world, bringing innovative work from all the current art hubs. Berlin features heavily- as the city the fair was founded- and delivers the vibrancy of the city’s increasingly dominant art scene. The booth format of the typical art fair is discarded for a more open space so it works as an exhibition in its entirety. Traditional media is also rejected for more innovative methods and the show sees installations, video art and even performance art thanks to the New York gallery On Stellar Rays- refreshingly subverting the money-driven vibe of many art fairs. This is suggested in the art featured, in particular an installation comprising of two vast mounds of earth, presented by Limoncello, one of the fair’s organising galleries. For me, a Kit Craig piece at Arcade sums up the premise of the show; a series of drawings prop up the fallen easels, which have pierced their canvas. This subverts traditional methods of display, as is done throughout the show. Another highlight of the fair is Ryan’s Bar, which provides refreshments and sees a different artist creating a cocktail each day; Fiona Banner’s challenge on the first day certainly got the crowds animated. Fifty pounds for a cocktail may seem exorbitant at first but the possibility of a prize from Banner definitely softens the blow. The cocktail hours over the rest of the week are no doubt going to be just as exciting when David Batchelor, Liam Gillick and Bob and Roberta Smith design their concoctions. The many visitors that that the opening day saw seemed to appreciate the different style of fair as there was a constant buzz throughout the day, which will no doubt be kept up until its closing on Saturday. The fair is unquestionably worth seeing: the diverse art, unique format and energetic atmosphere make it a great accomplishment. SUNDAY suggests that the art fair format could do so much more than what we have come to expect (a proposition I hope many more will take up!) http://sunday-fair.com/

Tania Moore

Friday 15 October, 2010

About the author

Having left the classical beauty of Oxford where she grew up, Tania now enjoys the vibrancy that Manchester offers where she presently lives; she relishes its lively music scene as well as the ever-evolving contemporary art that is found in the city. Her interests lay primarily in the visual arts but extend to theatre, dance and literature. Further to visiting exhibitions, shows and events, she also practices art and dance. Tania has a degree in the History of Art and is currently undertaking an MA programme in Art Gallery and Museum Studies at the University of Manchester.